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20121027
20121104
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and running today for the first time since superstorm sandy blew ashore. >> breezy point was absolutely devastated. it was completely leveled. >> we're just devastated from this. shocked. shocked that it's happened to us. >> governor romney is cautiously venturing back on to the campaign trail. president obama still tied up with dealing with the storm. >> two of the three major airports serving the new york area reopened. laguardia remains a flooded mess. >> uh-oh. uh-oh. >> we will reset halloween by executive order. my power knows no bounds. >> is that one of those governor chris christie fleece zip-ups. >> power to your house, nonexistent. that means darkness and candles and whining children. >> on "cbs this morning." >> people had no e-mail, facebook, twitter or instagram or as aol users put it, welcome to the party. >>> welcome to cbs this morning. as you wake up on the west coast, the remains of superstorm sandy are still being felt as far as wisconsin, but it's nothing like the damage here in the northeast. the death toll this morning is at least 57. 22 of them in new york city a
of superstorm sandy is moving into western new york and causing trouble as far west as wisconsin but nothing like the damage in the northeast. the death toll this morning is 55, 22 of them in new york city alone. >> 6.8 million utility customers are still without power in 16 states and washington, d.c. in hard hit lower manhattan officials say power will not be fully restored until the weekend at the earliest. however, financial markets will reopen this morning and major airports are also starting to reopen. our correspondents are all along the east coast again this morning reporting on the impact of superstorm sandy. >> we begin with jeff glor along the jersey shore which bore the brunt of sandy's wind and rain. president obama will visit the devastation there later today. jeff is in atlantic city. good morning. >> reporter: charlie, good morning. one situation firefighters are watching this morning is about 70 miles north of here, a fire has broken out and access to a bridge is limited or completely unavailable which could make fighting that fire difficult. overall here in new jersey two-t
. >> thank you. norah? >>> for four days during superstorm sandy, president obama and mitt romney took it easy on each other, but on thursday they were back on the attack. >> this is no time for small measures. this is time for real change. when i'm elected president on day one we'll bring real change to america. >> he's saying he's the candidate of change. well, let me tell you, wisconsin, we know what change looks like. and what the governor's offering sure ain't change. >> former white house press secretary robert gibbs is a senior adviser to the obama campaign and join us this morning. good morning, robert. >> good morning, norah, how are you? >> good, good. we have a jobs report coming up today. the unemployment number could tick up. doesn't that reinforce mitt romney's position that obama's record on the economy has been a failure? >> no, look, i think what we expect to see is continued movement forward. 32nd month of positive, private sector job growth adding to the 5 million jobs that's been created as a result of those positive months. look, we're not where we all want to end
of superstorm sandy's damage has become clearer and more alarming, five a day. this morning sandy is blamed for 75 deaths in ten states. and about 5 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city many subway and commuter trains are now running and the city has put restrictions on drivers trying to get into manhattan. drivers also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. this morning hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore are facing months even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in things where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself on wednesday. jeff, good morning. >> reporter: norah, good morning to you. 14 are dead in new jersey but there is increasing concern that as more homes are searched that toll could rise. on wednesday president obama walked along new jersey's battered coastline side-by-side with governor chris christie. both offering encouragement to sandy's survivors. >> we're here four. we won forget. we'll follow up to make sure you get all the help you need until you rebuild. >> reporter: after ge
correspondents are on the ground across the east covering the impact of superstorm sandy. >>> we begin our coverage in hard-hit new york city. president obama has just declared a state of emergency in new york and new jersey. jim axelrod is at battery park in manhattan, which was inundated with water. jim, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie. high tide has come here. at least in this part of battery park, the water is not threatening to come over the wall, which is at least one piece of good news in a city that is facing more than its share of trouble. superstorm sandy made landfall late monday. a wet and windy nightmare. >> we knew that this was going to be a very dangerous storm and the storm has met our expectations. >> reporter: actually, sandy exceeded them. around 9:00 pm the storm produced a record surge at battery park in manhattan, 14.88 feet breaching the sea wall and flooding the area. manhattan's waterfront seemed to disappear as the surge rushed over the wall. >> it's the unknown. it's the storm of the century. >> reporter: roads and cars wer
of superstorm sandy's damage is becoming cloe ining c more alarming. blamed for 75 deaths in 10 states and 4.6 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city, many subway and xhouter trains are now running. drivers are seeing huge traffic jams going into manhattan. they also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore this morning are facing months, even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in atlantic city, where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself. jeff, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, norah. 14 people dead in new jersey right now. there is concern that number might rise as more homes are sear searched. on wednesday, president obama walked along new jersey's battered coastline, side by side with governor chris christie. both offering encouragement to sandy's survivors. >> we are here for you. and we will not forget. we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help that you need until you've rebuilt. >> reporter: after getting an aerial view of the devastati
's death from superstorm sandy happened on staten island. homeland secretary janet napolitano is going there today, where people say they're suffering and not getting enough help. anna werner, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as you stand on this street in staten island you can clearly see the path of destruction wrought by hurricane sandy. cars picked up and tossed like toys. that continues throughout the neighborho neighborhood. many residents say they feel ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten burrough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we're going to die! we're going to freeze! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claiming their community has been ignored in the days following sandy while aid pours in to other parts of new york and new jersey. >> they don't talk about them that much. a lot of people here are hurting much it's upsetting. >> reporter: power is out. hundreds of homes have been destroyed and dozens of streets are impassable. still, the city is planning to go a
reality. superstorm sandy knocked out their power and some could be in the dark for ten days or longer. good morning. >> good morning. we are standing outside of a home here in arlington where the high winds from hurricane sandy toppled the 70-foot oak tree and sent it crashing into the second story of this home. we have spoken to the home owner and he's okay. he is the only one that was at home. but this is the scene that is facing thousands of homeowners that they wake up this morning and as these downed trees, power lines, and floods cut the electric power to 7.3 million homes. impact ranges from north carolina to here in virginia to new york city. where the most dramatic scene unfolded last night. the video is eerily quiet. but the explosion was described as deafening. bright blue flashes came from the lower east side of manhattan where the power company, con edison reported the storm blew out a transformer leaving parts of the city blacked out. on twitter, one new yorkers wrote everything went dark and i mean dark. another said lights out, manhattan, creepy. con
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8